Subject: Right Click

 

Tech Support: "I need you to right-click on the Open Desktop."

Customer: "OK."

Tech Support: "Did you get a pop-up menu?"

Customer: "No."

Tech Support: "OK. Right click again. Do you see a pop-up menu?"

Customer: "No."

Tech Support: "Ok, sir. Can you tell me what you have done up
until this point?"

Customer: "Sure, you told me to write 'click' and I wrote 'click'." (At this point I had to put the caller on hold to tell the rest of the tech support staff what had happened. I couldn't, however, stop from giggling when I got back to the call.)

Tech Support: "Ok, did you type 'click' with the keyboard?"

Customer: "I have done something dumb, right?"

 

 

 

 

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The Silicon Valley Theorem on Salary

 

states that engineers and scientists can never earn as much as business executives and sales people. This theorem can now be supported by a mathematical equation based on the following two postulates:

Postulate 1: Knowledge is Power.
Postulate 2: Time is Money.


As every engineer knows : Power = Work / Time


Since Knowledge = Power, and Time = Money, we have: Knowledge = Work / Money


Solving for Money, we get: Money = Work / Knowledge


Thus, as Knowledge approaches zero, Money approaches infinity, regardless of the amount of Work done.

Conclusion: The Less you Know, the More you Earn.

 

 

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Observations:


Trust the computer industry to shorten "Year 2000" to Y2K.
It was this kind of thinking that caused the problem in the first place.

 

 

Overheard from a software engineer:
"I've finally figured out why this whole Year 2000 problem is causing so much trouble. Fixing it depends on programmers finding a date. This isn't exactly one of our classic strengths.".

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Subj: Target Practice


One of Microsoft's finest techs was drafted and sent to boot camp. At the rifle range, he was given some instruction, a rifle, and
bullets. He fired several shots at the target. The report came from the target area that all attempts had completely missed the target.

The Microsoft tech looked at his rifle and then at the target again.

He looked at the rifle again, and then at the target again. He put his finger over the end of the rifle barrel and squeezed the trigger
with his other hand. The end of his finger was blown off, whereupon he yelled toward the target area: "It's leaving here just fine. The trouble must be at your end!"

 

 

 

 

 

 

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